HFAC is relocating!

Howdy art fans… please help get the word out: We are moving Hilo Fine Art Center back to our original location in Shipman Business Park! We’ve enjoyed our time in downtown Hilo but we’re adding screen printing to our line of services and want to keep everything in one location.
We’ll be making the move to 16-643 Kipimana Street (Keaau) the week of October 10 thru 14.  Stop by and see us sometime!

Introduction to Digital Painting/Drawing!

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Join us for one of two identical one-hour sessions:

10:30-11:30 or 1:00-2:00   $5 in advance, $10 at the door. Seating is limited so pre-registration is recommended.

Bring your tablet, iPad or smart phone for some fast, easy fun!

Instructor Carlton Stout is a visual artist with broad experience covering digital media arts, traditional media and digital fine arts. Carlton holds a Digital Arts degree with Honors from Hawaii Community College and has exhibited and sold work in juried shows and galleries.
He will be offering a Digital Painting & Drawing Seminar in January 2016. Take advantage of this interactive presentation to find out what to expect! There will be time for questions and answers before and after each session.

Flesh & Form: New exhibit starting May 1st

LIFEDRAWHilo Fine Art Center is proud to present an exhibit of works generated by artists attending the Figure Session held at the Cultural Center every Tuesday evening. These weekly sessions have been hosted for the last few years by Julianna Graper, nee Ziegler, and the exhibit is a thank-you to her for her good work. Mahalo, Jules, you have done the room proud!

I grew up as a painter in a similar room, working the figure. Though I could draw from life since high school, I had painted almost exclusively from photographs. At thirty, I was mostly self-taught and solitary. And dissatisfied with my work.

In 1987 I was about the eighth person to sign up with the newly formed Art Students League of Denver. Founded by Philip Levine, it was based on the New York model. One Tuesday evening I walked into the room (Long Pose Painting),set up my flimsy aluminum easel and student grade paint, and flailed away. It was the most humbling three hours and three bucks I have ever spent. I sucked. But I went back. And I sucked again, a little less. And back again. About the fourth or fifth time, I started to get it. Over time I got comfortable. (And the others in the room started looking me in the eye. I was getting less awkwardly bad…) I made some good friends, became a painter among painters. I found my Tribe. My work got much better.

Drawing and painting the figure is the calisthenics of making art. It’s the Great Hunt- you got 20 minutes and what can you capture? It’s live and RIGHT NOW. And again. And again. It’s where you develop your eye and your chops. It’s the most fun ever.

It’s also the most egalitarian and friendly room in the art cosmos.
(An aside. Though I grew up as a painter in the room, I truly became a man the night I walked into the room with my classy new French Easel-and student grade paint. Good paint followed soon, and I still have the easel. Faithful old thing.)

“Real artists work the figure” is one of the few good snobbisms left. Come see some real good work by some real, good artists!

Hubbard

Opening reception: Friday, May 1, 6-9pm.   Closing party Saturday, May 23, 4-7pm

David Hubbard on “Tradigital” Painting…

“Tradigital” is a blending of the words “traditional” and “digital”. The process of creating digital art is likewise a mixture of old and new. An artwork is considered tradigital if a significant step in the process of creating the artwork was performed using digital technology.

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Artists can experiment with infinite variations using uncoated giclée prints of the original as a starting point.

In the example seen here, the central painting is a traditional oil on canvas. the tradigital paintings on either side are significant reworks from the original painting, executed in oil over uncoated giclée canvas prints. These are original paintings in their own right and depart from the original painting far more than would enhanced giclée prints.

Digital/giclée prints are an important new tool in the artist’s creative kit, and can provide a painter with fresh options to choose from, choices which simply cannot be made within a single painting.

Tradigital painting allows artists to follow the advice of the great sage Yogi Berra, who once said, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”

It’s a whole new world…

We love our new scanner!

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The CRUSE Scanner’s unique light distribution system ensures the faithful reproduction of even the finest surface textures.

Yes folks, we’ve gone big time… and we’re loving it.

We’ve always thought we had a pretty good thing going here. The acquisition of a truly world-class CRUSE scanner is just icing on the cake.

Just how great are CRUSE scanners? The quality and detail of the digital files they produce make them the scanner of choice of organizations such as the Getty Foundation, The Pentagon, the Vatican and NASA, to name a few.

Weren’t we doing pretty well with what we already had?

As a matter of fact, running some tests confirmed the quality of our previous digital captures. However, they required a lot of tear-down and set-up, we couldn’t shoot through glass and we were limited when it came to the depth of texture we were able to reproduce. Well, not any more!

Come in, check it out. We think you’ll love our new scanner too!

New Exhibit Features Works by Norman David Carby

Norman David Carby Exhibit Poster
Exhibit runs from February 7 thru March 7, 2014.

“Hawaii Days”, a new exhibit featuring works by Norman David Carby opens during downtown Hilo’s monthly First Friday Artwalk and runs thru Friday, March 7.

Norman has made his home in Hawaii since 1983. His paintings display a unique hard-edged, graphic style. (Although, deep down, Norman is all soft edges… he’s offered to donate 10% of any sales to benefit local musician Kahea Rosehill as he recovers from reconstructive surgery!)

Chinese Lantern Workshop

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Learn how to make a beautiful,  functional Chinese lantern Thursday, Feb. 13th!

Living in Hilo, we are blessed with unmatched cultural diversity – and a bunch of special occasions. Just as we think we have wrapped up “The Holidays”, a new one pops up. To help keep the party rolling, HFAC is proud to present Chinese Lantern Making, “Island Style” with Kathleen Kam.

To celebrate the Year of the Green Wood Horse, participants will create Chinese Lanterns. These beautiful and functional pieces will be created in the traditional Chinese fashion, but with a bit of Big Island flair provided by Kathleen… and you!

Workshop Info:Thursday, Feb. 13 from 4-8pm

$60 per student. All supplies provided. Maximum 8 students

Register by contacting HFAC at 808-966-9995 or gallery@hilofineart.com

Something different for First Friday…

Hilo Fine Art Center is proud to announce that this month we’re doing something a little different for First Friday. 
 
We’re doing nothing.
More specifically, we are closing at 6 o’clock to go see Arthur Johnsen’s important exhibit at the EHCC/HMOCA. Arthur is one of Hawai’i’s major talents and is holding a retrospective in the Central Gallery there. It will be a beautiful room.
There is a small bit of controversy surrounding the show. Some will argue that Arthur is not nearly old enough, and certainly not dead enough, for a retrospective – but none will argue that he lacks the chops.

We will also be attending the Big Island Plein Air show at Wailoa Arts & Cultural Center. Forty artists from all around Hawaii Island will be exhibiting recent work. We look forward to viewing at least 600 pounds of landscapes there! (Mahalos to Leslie Sears for the cat herding.)

It’s a great month for Art in Hilo, and a good time to play a little hooky.
See you at the openings!